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Kavos 2016 in Drummore, Dumfries and Galloway, UK - Find out whats going on tonight in the Dumfries and Galloway area for "Kavos 2016" of Drummore. Featuring Kavos 2016, hot in Corfu, blue lagoon, Trinity Club, Madisons, Quayside Village, Snobs, Atlantis, Super Paint Party and Kavos 2016 in Drummore, Glenwhilly, Gretna Green, Gretna, Haugh of Urr, High Glasnick, and includes local tweets, a map and local events in Drummore. Are you #in2nite or #out2nite in Drummore for Kavos 2016

Not to be confused with Drummuir, north east Scotland

Drummore (drum-ORE; (from Gaelic An Druim Mòr meaning "the great ridge") is a village at the southern end of the Rhins of Galloway in Wigtownshire, Scotland: it has two satellite clachans, called Kirkmaiden and Damnaglaur.
The village lies where the Kildonan Burn runs out to the sea, north of the Mull of Galloway. It is the most southerly village in Scotland, and further south than the English cities of Durham and Carlisle. It is in the Dumfries and Galloway Council area and the parish and community of Kirkmaiden and is about 16 miles (26 km) from the nearest major town, the ferry port of Stranraer. In the 2011 census, the population was 534.
Drummore shares its name with High Drummore a mile (1.6 km) up Glen Lee, and also with Drummore Glen 1⁄2 mile (800 m) to the east. The underlying name is clearly the Gaelic "druim mòr" or "big ridge", and it has been suggested that this reflected the motte associated with the castle of the Adairs of Kinhilt, whose lands were granted in 1602 by King James VI.
The rather scattered incidence of related names, however, makes it more likely that the hill-ridge itself is in question, although at 90 m (300 ft) it is not all that prominent compared to the 140 m (450 ft) Muntloch Fell and Inshanks Fell to the west, or even the 76 m (250 ft) Mull of Galloway itself, 3 miles (5 km) to the south.
A branch line was proposed in 1877 linking to the Portpatrick Railway. It was opposed by the feudal landowner, the Earl of Stair, and finally abandoned after the failure of the City of Glasgow Bank in 1882; aspects of the village's street layout still reflect plans for the railway.



Drummore: 54.666667, -4.900000